The link between Cardiovascular Disease and Periodontal disease (Gums) is proven.

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE AND PERIODONTAL DISEASE (GUMS)

Key studies have created a consensus within the medical and dental community that periodontal bacteria, that is the cause of gum disease, also contributes to not only the initiation, but also the prognosis of cardiovascular disease. This is a major breakthrough in treating heart disease.

In addition to contributing to the cause of heart disease, studies have proven that persons with untreated periodontal infections have an increased risk of strokes and peripheral vascular disease, even after adjusting for a history of smoking, obesity, diabetes and other socio-economic factor.

Specific bacteria associated with gum disease are also known to contribute to inflammation of the arterial wall so getting treatment for gum disease is an obvious choice you would think, but still so few seek help.

Gum disease (periodontal disease) is so often undetected until it is too late, and teeth are lost but a simple saliva test will tell you if you have these dangerous bacteria present, and how much of it there is. The consequence of not doing this is that you could be putting your health at risk, alongside your teeth. Losing a tooth is inconvenient enough but contributing to cardiovascular disease is a whole new ball game.

Gum disease is treatable, and nowadays painless. The tests needed are easy to perform and a full periodontal assessment could have a real benefit on your health.

If you have a history of heart or gum disease in the family or if you think you may have unidentified gum disease then please call and make an appointment to have this test.

The DNA saliva test also identifies early signs of;

  • Diabetes
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Sjogren’s Syndrome
  • Oral Cancers
  • HPV

These diseases all have nearly invisible symptoms in their early stages but are present in the protein molecules and genetic material in saliva.

This blog is a synopsis of a report written by Dr McGlennen and presented in OralDNA with supporting reference links.